Architects' Sketchbooks

Architects' Sketchbooks

  1. Edited by Will Jones
  2. Foreword by Narinder Sagoo
  • ISBN 9780500342688
  • 22.00 x 29.70 cm
  • PLC (no jacket)
  • 352pp
  • Illustrated in colour and black and white throughout
  • First published 2011
‘… offers a rare glimpse of the architectural creative processes’ – Monocle
‘A fascinating insight into “the blood, sweat and pencil lead" that go into designing the world we live in’ – i
‘With 500 illustrations rendered in every conceivable media the reader is left wondering why these ‘sketches’ aren’t displayed in galleries, and imagining the wonderful environment we’d live in if these flights of fancy were actually granted planning permission’ – 125 Magazine

A privileged view of the sketchbooks of over eighty architects and studios, showing how they use drawing to express their spatial ideas while revealing their individual methods

Architects' Sketchbooks shows what goes on in architects' minds as they envisage the built World and recast it through their imagination and visual skill.

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This is the first survey to present the private sketchbooks of 85 architects, from such starchitects as Will Alsop, Shigeru Ban, Norman Foster and Eva Jiricna to rising talents from all over the world.

Will Jones's introduction explores the artistry behind the built world, and the importance of sketching as part of the design process; the sketches themselves range from simple pencil line drawings and clear perspectives to abstract compositions in pastel and collage, from quick freehand to measured mapping, from spontaneous squiggles on napkins to careful drawings on art paper.

Densely packed with over 750 illustrations, Architects' Sketchbooks is a celebration of how a sketch can become the start of a skyscraper.

Also of interest
Unbuilt Masterworks of the 21st Century by Will Jones
The Architectural Drawing Course: Understand the Principles and Master the Practices
New Forms: Plans and Details for Architects
Perspective: From Basic to Creative
Visualizing Ideas: From Scribbles to Storyboards